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The Center is proud to partner on this webinar with group-buying partner Goldin Group!

Time to breathe a bit easier, right? The eight-week reprieve is in hand, and now you can rest secure in the knowledge that your business will make it through the second quarter…

Well, not so fast – this is most definitely NOT the time to rest. To the contrary, this is the time to develop your plan for what to do with the loan money, and more importantly, what to do after the loan money runs out eight weeks from now.

In this webinar we will highlight considerations to maximize the forgiveness amount, understand what factor may decrease the forgiveness amount and as importantly begin planning for future cash needs.

Get the answers to:
• What will business conditions look like in eight weeks? Will your business still be impacted or shuttered?
• Should you re-hire all, some or none of the employees you laid off?
• Should you bring furloughed staff back on active payroll?
• Should you reinstate salaries that you reduced? And do you need to bring them back up to 100% or can you raise them incrementally?
• If you decide to only activate some of the furloughed or laid off employees, which ones do you bring back and how do you do that while staying compliant with the many labor laws?
• After the eight weeks, will you have to turn right around and lay off/furlough the same people you just brought back on board?
• Is 100% forgiveness of the loan the right goal?
• What happens if you don’t hit the 75% payroll costs threshold?
• If you carry some of the PPP loan proceeds over into a 2-year note at 1%, how much should you try to carry over and what do you use it for? Furthermore, what’s your ability to repay that money?

This webinar is FREE to attend, but prior registration is required.

Register Now!

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The Center is proud to partner with Group-Buying Partner Goldin Group on this webinar!

Join our conversation to learn everything nonprofits need to know about two of the largest Federal Stimulus Aid Programs. We will review the Families First Coronavirus Response Act and how it can affect your organization, what your obligations are and how to enforce it. We will also review the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES), a 2 trillion dollar legislation which contains two principal programs the Paycheck Payroll Protection (PPP) and the Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL). Learn what they offer, which may be best for you and how to get your loan forgiven.

This webinar is FREE and open to everyone, but registration is required.

Register Now!

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The Center is proud to partner with Group-Buying Partner Mylestone Plans on this webinar!

Please join Amir Eyal and his team for this important webinar.

What We Will Be Presenting

  • What is the CARES Act?
  • What are the business provisions in the Act that apply to your nonprofit?
  • Paycheck Protection Program
  • Charitable Giving Incentives for Donors of 501(c)(3)s
  • Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) grants.
  • Employee Retention Payroll Tax Credits

What are the individual provisions in the Act that apply to your employees?

  • Unemployment Insurance Provisions
  • Recovery Rebates
  • Changes to Retirement Provisions
  • Student Loan Repayment Tax Benefit

Register Now!

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Covid-19 and Racial Inequity
in the Greater Washington Nonprofit Sector

Presented on October 21, 2020

The Center commissioned research from Brighter Strategies as part of a regional study to determine how to structure support that best serves area needs. The data collected focused on the impact of the pandemic and racial inequity in our region—Washington, DC, Maryland and Virginia—and is important to the proprieties and action agendas for all sectors.

On October 21, the results of the research were reviewed by  Glen O'Gilvie, CAE, CEO, Center for Nonprofit Advancement, and Elizabeth Scott, PhD, President /CEO, Brighter Strategies, and discussed with close to 100 nonprofit leaders in our area.

See the outcome

If you were unable to participate, you can download the results, as well as watch a recording of the event (Passcode: I!6?T&cm).

Sector Rebuilding Campaign

To further our mission and foster the sustainability of nonprofit organizations through the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond, the Center is launching a Sector ReBuilding Campaign, consisting of three components: Evaluation, Education and Action. The Center staff and its network of consultants with extensive experience and subject matter expertise in nonprofit management will support Center members and participating organizations through the following activities:

Evaluation
    • Conduct research on the impact of COVID-19 on the nonprofit sector through surveys, individual and group interviews to understand their needs and challenges
    • Engage with nonprofit organizations to evaluate their circumstances and provide technical assistance, guidance and consulting as necessary to support each organization’s ability to recover and rebuild
    • Engage with other capacity building organizations in the region to fully understand their offerings and curate a directory of resources available to nonprofit organizations
Education
    • Host a series of convenings for nonprofit board members and leaders on COVID-19 impact and rebuilding strategies, including collaborations, strategic alignment and mergers
    • Provide crisis management and leadership capacity building, customized for organizations by size, mission and the degree of challenge experienced
    • Provide information to nonprofit organizations about all capacity building resources available in the region to help them address their needs
    • Share information with the philanthropic community in our region to increase awareness of the challenges facing the nonprofit sector to help inform philanthropic and other efforts to support the nonprofit community
Action
    • Facilitate organizational rebuilding strategies, including developing collaborations, strategic alignment and merger tips, strategies and coaching
    • Assist nonprofit organizations in navigating government funding opportunities and provide technical assistance, including grant writing, as needed
    • Develop and assist in the implementation of pandemic specific strategic planning processes

Resources & Tools

There is a multitude of tools, webinars and resources being created to assist nonprofits in coping with the ongoing impact of COVID-19 and transitioning back to an unfamiliar normal. To keep you informed and up-to-date, the Center will continue to post helpful resources as we learn of them.

Prepared by UST

COVID-19 HR Sample Policies

Members can access these helpful COVID-19 human resource tools, including sample policies for Work from Home, Emergency Paid Sick Leave, Emergency Family and Medical Leave and a Furlough Letter.

Prepared by Center Industry Expert West, Lane & Schlager

COVID-19 Tenant Strategies

As a result of the COVID0-19 crisis, WLS Realty expects lower rental rates and greater tenant concession packages as well as other favorable lease terms to be available market wide. So act now or wait? See their tenant strategy recommendations.

Prepared by Group-Buying Partner Goldin Group 

Coronavirus Aid Packages—What You Need to Know

Download the presentation from this webinar about two of the largest Federal Stimulus Aid Programs:

  • a review of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act and how it can affect your organization, what your obligations are and how to enforce it
  • a review the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES), a 2 trillion dollar legislation which contains two principal programs the Paycheck Payroll Protection (PPP) and the Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL).

Learn what they offer, which may be best for you and how to get your loan forgiven.

Prepared by Industry Expert Good Insight

Articles guiding nonprofit executives and board members through the COVID-19 crisis

This series of articles speaks to the challenges nonprofit leaders face in successfully guiding their organizations through this pandemic. Includes access to their COVID-19 emergency management checklist to ensure your organization is safeguarded.

Prepared by SBA

Paycheck Protection Program

The Small Business Administration’s Paycheck Protection Program provides potentially forgivable loans for nonprofits with 500 or fewer employees at 2.5x your average month payroll, up to $10M to 501(c)(3) nonprofits experiencing uncertainty in the current economic climate to help cover the costs of payroll and certain operational expenses. SBA will forgive loans if all employees are kept on the payroll for eight weeks after the loan originates and the money is used for payroll, rent, mortgage interest, or utilities. Eligible nonprofits must have their materials ready as quickly as possible since the first come-first served application process opened on Friday April 3rd and is continuing.

Prepared by FMA

Paycheck Protection Toolbox

FMA Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Updated Tuesday 4/7 11:15 am ET

FMA guide to the Paycheck Protection Program and How to Apply (pdf) Updated Tuesday 4/7 11 am ET

FMA PPP Calculator (xls) — Updated Tuesday, 4/7 9 am ET—  This calculator will help you estimate the average monthly payroll and loan amount for your application.

FMA Template for Board Resolution Authorizing Loan (docx) — This template will allow you to quickly get approval from your board to apply for a PPP loan.

FMA Script for talking to a Bank about PPP (docx) — This script provides you with key questions you can use to call a bank immediately.

Prepared in part by Center faculty members Meico Whitlock, Mindful Techie and Barbara O’Reilly, Windmill Hill Consulting

Nonprofit Resources List: #NPCOVID19

Curated by an experienced group of nonprofit professionals, this document includes a comprehensive list of resources.

Prepared by the PATH Foundation

$485,000 Granted in Response to COVID-19 in Fauquier and Rappahannock counties

The grants will act as flexible emergency funds for organizations with services to meet immediate needs in our community; these include childcare organizations to ensure options are available to essential workforce, food and nutrition, and access to healthcare and internet.

Prepared by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce

CORONAVIRUS EMERGENCY LOANS: Small Business Guide and Checklist

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act allocated $350 billion to help small businesses keep workers employed amid the pandemic and economic downturn. Known as the Paycheck Protection Program, the initiative provides 100% federally guaranteed loans to small businesses. Here are the questions you may be asking—and what you need to know.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund

The Greater Washington Community Foundation, in collaboration with regional partners, has established the COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund to support emergency preparedness and response efforts that will help mitigate the impact on disproportionately affected communities in our region. Through this fund, we are focused on addressing lost wages, relief for small business and gig economy workers, expanding access to medical services, and meeting the unique needs of people experiencing homelessness, among other needs. Learn more about what this fund supports and how you can submit an RFP.

What Happens to My Retirement Plan?

With the current impact of COVID-19 on the economy, worries extend beyond our physical health to our financial health. The Center partnered with The Capital Group to host a Retirement Plan Overview webinar on March 25 to address the following:

How to calm the fears of your employees
Market turmoil overview
Managing market emotions

This is pertinent to any retirement plan. Register for a recording of the webinar here.

Prepared by the Association of Fundraising Professionals

Charitable giving in times of fear

Like the Great Recession, it’s likely that the current situation will pass. And donors still want to make a difference and be in control. For the same reason that hoarding toilet paper allows people to have some control over the current situation, so too can donors take control and help their favorite nonprofit. This analysis of charitable giving during the Great Recession shows nonprofits can survive these unsettling times—and even prosper.

Loans available from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA)

Nonprofits in the District of Columbia can now apply for low-interest working capital loans of up to $2 million from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) to help alleviate economic injury resulting from the on-going coronavirus pandemic. Learn about the Three Step Process.

Prepared by Exponentum®

Families First Coronavirus Response Act: What Nonprofit Employers Need to Know

Exponentum®, in partnership with the law firm of Orrick, Herrington, and Sutcliffe LLP, has prepared this article to help guide nonprofit employers responding to Covid-19.The D.C. Bar Pro Bono Center, a proud member of Exponentum—a national network of business law pro bono providers, has shared this with the Center.

Presented by ThinkHR:

COVID-19 HR Guidance and Best Practices

In this on-demand webinar, Kara Govro, Senior Legal Editor with ThinkHR, addresses the most common HR questions relating to COVID-19, and shares resources and best practices on topics including work-from-home policies, FMLA and PTO.

Template prepared by the Center:

Telecommuting Policy & Procedure

Presented by Tech Impact:

Prepare Your Nonprofit for Smooth Sailing Through COVID-19

Attempts to slow the spread of the Coronavirus might involve closing nonprofit offices and program sites. But that doesn’t have to shut down your operations or your services. Center Industry Expert Tech Impact hosted a presentation and Q&A with experts about how to rapidly get the right technology in place and minimize disruptions to your organization. Access a recording of the webinar to hear about:

  • Options for cloud productivity tools such as email and file sharing
  • Tech policies for people working remotely and using personal devices
  • Ways to start delivering programs and services remotely, in under a month
  • A few tips for sanitizing your tech devices (always a good idea)

Tech Impact is also offering free advice to any nonprofit who needs help with remote work. Request a consultation on www.techimpact.org.

Podcasts presented by Manager Tools:

Distant Manager Basics Part 1
Distant Manager Basics Part 2

Presented by Greater Washington Society of CPAs:

Legal Strategies for Nonprofit Meetings

(recorded 3/10/20)

Business Continuity Planning-How to Prepare For Coronavirus Impact

(recorded 3/11/20)

Helpful steps for now and down the road

In addition to taking and promoting proper precautions of cleaning hands regularly, avoiding touching your face and covering your cough or sneeze with a tissue, the Center is encouraging organization leaders to take these steps.

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August 24 – 30

ACT for Alexandria is mentioned in an article about the local fight to end racial inequality, reported by Alexandria Times.

American’s for Peace Now argue for two-state support at meeting with Envoy Friedman as discussed in their featured article on The Jerusalem Post.

The Army Historical Foundation is featured in multiple articles discussing the official announcement of their new National Museum of the U.S. Army to open in June 2020, reported by USA Today and the DCist.

Beacon House welcomes three new board members: Tony Elachkar, a Managing Director with Guidehouse LLP, Candice Gayl, an Air Force veteran who has been working as an independent consultant for 15 years, and Glenda Lee, a lead instructor with the Academy of Hospitality and Tourism (AOHT) at Ballou Senior High School.

Bright Beginnings is mentioned in an article about Washington Mystics’ Natasha Cloud and her winning of the Dawn Staley Community Leadership Award, reported by the Washington Mystics.

Capital Area Asset Builders is featured in an article about DC’s experiments with giving rental subsidy recipients control over their spending, reported by Street Sense Media.

Carpenter’s Shelter is mentioned in an article discussing a local Alexandria mall redevelopment, reported by Alexandria Living. The organization is also mentioned in an article about the annual event, Taste of Old Town North, reported by the Alexandria Times.

Catholics for Housing (CFH) is featured in an article discussing Northern Virginia’s growing crisis in affordable housing, reported by the Catholic Herald.

Child Care Aware is mentioned in an article featuring a recent report that found the cost of child care in Virginia has risen 7 times more than women’s wage growth, reported on Fredericksburg.com.

Sarah Hall Aguila, director of operations at Central American Resource Center, is interviewed in an article discussing why certain immigrant communities thrive in Washington, DC, reported by US News.

Community Foodworks is mentioned in an article discussing how urban farmers are working to end ‘Food Deserts in DC’, reported by AFRO.

The Council for Court Excellence is featured in an article discussing the future of DC’s halfway houses for men, reported by the DCist.

Patty McCarthy Metcalf, executive director of Faces & Voices of Recovery, is interviewed in an article discussing HHS efforts to change SUD privacy rules, reported on Health Data Management.

The Institute of Hazardous Materials Management (IHMM) intends to start assisting the news media with their own new media service that will give expert commentary any time a hazardous materials incident occurs, reported by Benzinga.

Miriam’s Kitchen is featured in an article discussing the many ways that leftover food turns into meals for DC’s homeless community, reported by DCist.

The National Family Farm Coalition is mentioned in an article discussing a new farm policy and whether or not the policy will help rural America rebound, reported by Civil Eats. Jordan Treakle, also with the Coalition, is featured in an article discussing financial problems and mental health concerns for farmers, reported by Tristate Homepage.

PRS CrisisLink celebrates its 50th Anniversary with a special event on Thursday, September 19, 6:00–8:00 pm at the PRS Administrative Office and PRS CrisisLink Call Center in Oakton, VA. Visit their website to RSVP or for more information about sponsorship opportunities.

The First Tee of Greater Washington, DC is working with NBA Star Stephen Curry on a new golf program at Howard University, reported by CNN.

Together We Bake has received a $10,000 lifeline from AT&T, as reported by The Zebra.

Amy Pisani, executive director of Vaccinate Your Family (formerly known as Every Child By Two), is featured in an article discussing new federal rules that allegedly threaten to discourage undocumented immigrants from vaccinating their children, reported by STAT.

Washington Interfaith Network and their lead organizer, Jennifer Knox, are featured in an article discussing the Wells Fargo announcement of a $1 billion investment into affordable housing. Reported by AFRO.

Washington Regional Alcohol Program will host a “Football & Fundraising” event September 18 in Fairfax City to benefit the organization’s anti-drunk driving initiatives, reported by Patch.

August 17 – 23

The Anacostia Coordinating Council was one of 16 organizations to receive part of an $800,000 grant awarded by Mayor Bowser for 2020 census community engagement, featured in an article on WAMU 88.5.

April Foreman, Ph.D., an executive committee member for the American Association of Suicidology, is featured in an article about suicide prevention, reported by Woman’s Day.

Sarah Meek, director of legislative affairs for the American Network of Community Options and Resources (ANCOR) is interviewed in an article about Trump extending a program helping people leave ceratin institutions, reported by disabilityscoop.

The Army Historical Foundation is featured in an article about their efforts to help open a new interactive museum in northern Virginia, reported by Leisure.

Bright Beginnings is featured in an article about Richmond police officers helping children with back-to-school shopping, reported by NBC 12.

Casey Trees is mentioned in an article for their efforts to help save D.C.’s trees from Dutch elm disease, reported by USA Today.

Abel Nuñez, executive director of the Central American Resource Center, is featured in an article about making D.C.’s immigrant communities count in the 2020 census, reported by WAMU 88.5. The organization is also part of a group of advocates suing the Trump Administration over a rule targeting immigrants of color, reported by Colorlines.

The Institute for Local Self-Reliance is referenced in an article discussing Dollar Store’s success and its effect on low income Americans, reported by KUOW.

Enlisted Association of the National Guard is featured in an article discussing the fight over for-profit colleges’ funding centers for veterans, on The Wall Street Journal.

Everyone Home DC is featured in an article in the Washington Post encouraging people to give back through the organization’s programs. The nonprofit is also featured in an article about the Sip and Savor event on September 14, in which some of the proceeds will go to Everyone Home DC, reported by The Hill is Home.

Friends of Guest House will open a new home next month in Old Town for formerly incarcerated women, reported by Alexandria Living.

Lung Cancer Alliance‘s merger with the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation to form the GO2 Foundation for Lung Cancer, was highlighted in US News. Their partnership with eHealth app Belong.Life to improve treatment management was reported by Cision PR Newswire.

The International Center for Research on Women is featured in an article discussing ways to improve your presence as an introvert, reported by Refinery29.

The International Spy Museum is mentioned in an article referencing some of its exhibits and featuring a CIA disguise artist from the Cold War era, reported by PBS News Hour.

The Literacy Council of Northern Virginia is hosting a new schedule of classes this fall for adult English-language learners in a variety of locations across Northern Virginia, reported by insideNOVA.

Miriam’s Kitchen is featured in an article about a local restaurant that donates customer reservation cancellation fees to the nonprofit, reported by the Washington City Paper.

Diana Zuckerman, president of the National Center for Health Research, is featured in an article discussing the Virginia Crime Commission and their data on mass shootings, reported by The Washington Post.

The National Council of Negro Women, the Tom Joyner Foundation and PUSH Excel announced a partnership with Denny’s recently. The celebration event was recapped by Rolling Out.

Diane Yentel, president of the National Low Income Housing Coalition, is featured in an article discussing Trump’s rule to make it tougher to prove discriminatory housing practices, reported by ABC News, NBC News, and Newsone.

Rappahannock Rapidan Community Services, in partnership with other local community partners, will host a community suicide prevention conference in September according to Inside NoVA.

The First Tee of Greater Washington, D.C., is featured in an article discussing famous athletes, like Tiger Woods and Stephen Curry, and their efforts to improve diversity in golf, reported by The Washington Post.

Washington Regional Alcohol Program is mentioned in two articles about Virginia’s law enforcement plans to increase DUI checkpoints on Labor Day weekend, reported by Richmond Times and The Connection.

The Worker Rights Consortium is featured in an article discussing apparel brands like Levi Strauss and The Children’s Place uniting to tackle gender-based violence in Lesotho, reported by Just Style. The organization is also featured in articles discussing its recent report on the Levi’s, Wrangler, and Lee seamstresses that are being harassed in Lesotho, reported on Kokomo Tribune and Fashion United.

August 10 – 16

Lucy Beadnell, Director of Advocacy at the Arc of Northern Virginia, was awarded the John Duty Collins III Outstanding Advocate for Persons with Disabilities Award during the 2019 Disability Awareness Awards Ceremony according to The Zebra.

Arlington Community Foundation will hold its annual Spirit of Community Luncheon to honor this year’s William T. Newman, Jr. Spirit of Community award recipient Dr. Alfred Taylor, Jr. on October 15, reported by ARLnow.com.

At Home Alexandria is referenced in an article about Jane King, an Alexandria native who has made invaluable contributions to making Alexandria a more livable community for older adults, reported by Zebra.

The American Association for Suicidology is referenced in an article discussing suicide survivors and what can be done to help them in The Barnstable Patriot.

W. Brent Christensen, director of the American Institute in Taiwan, is featured in an article discussing Taiwan’s intent to increase defense spending amid China instability, reported by Military Times.

Britepaths needs help providing school supplies and monetary donations are especially sought, according to an article published by the Fairfax Connection.

Building Bridges Across the River is featured in an article discussing D.C.’s highly-anticipated bridge park by OMA and OLIN coming in 2023, reported by The Architects Newspaper. They were also highlighted in The Washington Post for their support of CulturalDC’s “The Barbershop Project”.

Martha Arevalo, executive director of Central American Resource Center (CARCEN), is featured in an article discussing children of TPS (Temporary Protected Status) holders fighting for their parents’ protection in court, reported by NBC News.

Capital Area Asset Builders‘ partnership with the District of Columbia to administer the DC Opportunity Accounts program was featured in Fairfax Times.

The Carpenter’s Shelter received the 2019 Disability Awareness Award presented by the American Physical Therapy Association as reported by The Zebra.

Elizabeth Lower-Basch, director of income and work supports at the Center for Law and Social Policy, is featured in an article discussing the Department of Homeland Security’s recent finalization of its “public charge” rule on The American Prospect. She is also featured in an article reporting that illness is one of many new factors to count against immigrants seeking US residency, in The Washington Post. Olivia Golden, executive director of the organization, is featured in an article discussing the “public charge” rule in Arab American News.

Jeffrey Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy, is featured in an article reporting that a ‘big data’ firm sold Cambridge Analytica’s methods to global politicians, in Quartz. Jeffrey is also featured in an article discussing privacy questions as humans reviewed user audio at Facebook reported by WILX-10.

Child Care Aware of Virginia is featured in an article promoting their shipment of 1,000 hang tag giveaways, designed to remind parents, grandparents and other caregivers that young children are still in the car, on Fredericksburg.com.

Chef Venod, a recently appointed board member of DC Central Kitchen, is featured in an article by WUSA-9 discussing his background and his many contributions to the community.

The Fund for the Future of Our Children is referenced in an article discussing Grace Cavalieri, a Maryland poet laureate, who frequently works with the organization, reported by Capital Gazette.

The International Center for Research on Women is listed in an article featuring organizations that are fighting for women’s rights in the US and abroad, on Insider.

International Spy Museum hosted hundreds of partygoers for the “Mission Impossible: Party Protocol” sponsored by Brightest Young Things according to The Washington Post.

John Farrell of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, is referenced in an article discussing the Green New Deal, reported on CNN. The Institute is also referenced in an article reporting on Amazon’s delivery infrastructure on Vice.

The League of American Orchestras is referenced in an interview with Damon Gupton, an actor on a tv series titled ‘Black Lightning’, who helped Damon with his musical pursuit, reported by the Cincinnati Business Courier.

Loudoun Therapeutic Riding announced that Susan Fiske Koehler will serve as Executive Director according to Loudoun Now. Koehler, who has served in the role on an interim basis, also served as a judge for The Center for Nonprofit Advancement’s AIM Award.

The Lorton Community Action Center is referenced in an article discussing the National Night Out in Lorton, an event they coordinated that took place on August 6, 2019, posted on Fairfax Station Connection.

Maryland Nonprofits President and CEO, Heather Iliff, discussed the decline in charitable giving to arts organizations in Greenwich Time.

McLean Project for the Arts unveils lineup for the upcoming festival, the MPAartfest, in the Tyson Reporter.

Brittney Washington, a senior caseworker at Miriam’s Kitchen, is featured in an article discussing racial equity and homelessness, reported by Street Sense Media.

The National Association of Area Agencies on Aging is featured in an article discussing aging in place programs on Next Avenue.

Dr. Diana Zuckerman, president of the National Center for Health Research, is featured in an article discussing teen vaping and the astounding rate of hospitalization as a result, reported by CBS News and is also in Yahoo Entertainment.

The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans is mentioned in an article discussing the story of the son of a MIA Vietnam vet flying his dad’s remains home on  NPR  and in the Toronto Sun.

Lori Smetanka, executive director of the National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care, is featured in an article discussing a recent analysis finding most nursing facilities are failing in CMS requirements around RN staffing, reported by McKnights.

Denny’s will serve as a presenting sponsor of the 2019 National Council of Negro Women’s ‘Hungry For Education HBCU Tour’ as reported by Yahoo Finance.

The National Low Income Housing Coalition is referenced in an article discussing ideas, policies, proposals, suggestions and radical notions to fight the affordable housing crisis on Bisnow.com. President and CEO, Diane Yentel, is also referenced in an article discussing a new Trump administration rule cracking down on legal immigrants in Michigan, on Michigan Advance as well as Curbed.

Wharton seminars for business journalists announces two all-expenses-paid fellowships for its October 2019 program, courtesy of the National Press Foundation, as reported by Yahoo Finance.

The Community Foundation for Northern Virginia’s Business Women’s Giving Circle is now accepting applications for its 2019 grant cycleNonprofit organizations and schools can apply for grants of up to $20,000 to support STEM programs serving girls and young women, preschool through college age in Northern Virginia.

Partnership for Global Security is referenced in an article discussing advanced nuclear reactors and their promise of clean energy for gulf countries on Utilities.

John Hedrick, vice president of operations of the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, is featured in an article discussing a parks innovative new approach with toilets that use worms to compost your bathroom waste, reported by Popular Science.

Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities‘ legal director, Morgan Whitlatch, was featured on The Kojo Nnamdi Show on Wednesday, August 7, discussing the need to extend the DDA Health Initiative contract to allow for meaningful stakeholder input on the future of health care coordination services for DC residents with intellectual disabilities.

Tina Campanella, Quality Trust’s CEO, was quoted in the Washington Post on July 25 on the DC government plan to end disabilities services contract.

Amy Schwartzman, senior Rabbi at Temple Rodef Shalom, is featured in an article discussing Tyson’s Corners’ lack of a single congregation and local faith leaders desire to help it find its soul, reported on GGWashington.

Wesley Housing Development Corporation announced three additions to their real estate development team on The Zebra.

A report by the Worker Rights Consortium was recently published and has been featured in a CBS News article referencing the sexual harassment and violence at Levi and Wrangler jean facilities.

 

August 3 – 9

Colleen Creighton, executive director at the American Association of Suicidology, was interviewed for a webinar discussing crisis management on PR News.

Americans for Peace Now (APN) urges Congress and presidential candidates to commit to supporting two states, and to reject Trump’s departure from this long-held principal US policy objective, in a featured article on The Arab Daily News.

Antoine Elachkar, Managing Director at Guidehouse, has been named to the Board at Beacon House, as reported by PR Newswire.

Bright Beginnings is featured in an article discussing their recent efforts to aid students with school shopping on the Yadkin Ripple.

Casey Trees is featured in an article discussing the recent lack of rain and its effect on the local environment by The Washington Post.

Abel Nunez, executive director of the Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), discusses the recent mass shootings, as well as what is and can be done to prevent them in a podcast on Sputnik.

Jeff Chester, director of the Center for Digital Democracy, is featured in an article discussing concerns with data rights on Clay Today. The Center is also featured in an article discussing Facebook and a proposed privacy settlement and new oversight on Media Post.

Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) Executive Director Olivia Golden, is interviewed in an article discussing recent ICE raids, English Forums. Carrie Welton, a policy analyst at CLASP, is featured in an article on Education Drive discussing college groups voicing their support for a bill to help students get SNAP benefits.

The Council for Court Excellence is featured in an article discussing the lack of halfway houses for men returning from federal prison in The Washington Post.

DC Vote is featured in an article discussing ‘the agony of statelessness in DC’ on The DC Line.

Effie Worldwide is featured in an article discussing South African advertising and media case studies on The Media Online.

Hemophilia Federation of America seeks additional explanations from Bayer on mislabeled Kogenate recall, as reported by Hemophilia News Today. CEO Kimberly Haugstad has left HFA and been hired by Global Genes as CEO, as reported by PR Newswire.

Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington, D.C. will be performing at the National Trans Visibility March Benefit Concert on August 23, as reported by Washington Blade.

Kelly Blanks has joined Loudoun Citizens for Social Justice/Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter (LAWS) as the nonprofit’s first director of development, reported by Loudoun Now.

The National Association of Area Agencies on Aging awarded MARC, a home-delivery meal service organization, its 2019 Aging Innovations Award for MARC’s recent app as reported by Shawnee Mission Post

The National Center For Health Research is featured in an article discussing the dangers of vaping on the Inquistr. The Center’s president, Diana Zuckerman, was interviewed in an article discussing expensive medications and the money in big pharmaceuticals on USA Today.

The National Council of Negro Women founder, Dorothy Height, was recently remembered locally for her legacy of leadership at a luncheon event reported by the SacObserver.

A new report by the National Low Income Housing Coalition shows blight of housing instability in an article on Orlando Sentinel.

The Parks Main Street helped three local small businesses receive a total of $50,000 from the District’s Department of Small and Local Business Development (DSLBD) to support improvements to their operations and better meet changing customer demands.

PHILLIPS Programs for Children and Families is featured in an article discussing how 3D printing has helped kids with autism on Yahoo.

Potomac Appalachian Trail Club is featured in an article discussing the best locations for hiking in the area on Fauquier Times.

Rick Blum, the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press’ policy director, is featured in an article discussing a controversial board policy recently instituted by CalPERS’, reported by Chief Investment Officer.

Matthew Costello, senior historian for the White House Historical Association, is featured in an article discussing the history and symbolism of the U.S. Presidential Seal on howstuffworks.com. Lindsay Chervinsky, also a historian at the Association, was interviewed in an article discussing presidential vacations in the past by The Washington Post.

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… and reduce the negative impact of the new tax law.

With the increase in the standard deduction and the new limitation on state and local tax deductions, fewer people itemized on their 2018 returns, thus decreasing the tax incentive to make charitable gifts. In addition, the estate and gift tax exclusions were also doubled, which may lessen the incentive to make bequests to charities. According to the Tax Policy Center, these changes led to an estimated 12 to 20 billion dollar decline in overall charitable giving, or roughly a 5% decline in contributions.

So, what should your nonprofit do?

Focus on developing high net worth donors now and educating individuals on maximizing their way of giving, recommends Javier Goldin, managing partner of Goldin Group CPAs. Further he offers four suggestions to give potential donors.

1. Group gifts

One way to join the 1 in 10 tax filers expected to itemize this year is to do something called bunching. With this strategy, as many deductible expenses as possible (for example, medical expenses) are shifted into one year, so that itemizing becomes advantageous. Then the standard deduction is taken the next year or two.

In the case of charitable gifts, that would mean donating two or three years’ worth of gifts in one year. This may be tough for those who may not have extra cash accessible, but there’s a solution to that issue. By making a substantial gift—typically a minimum of $5,000—to a donor-advised fund, the donor can deduct the full gift now and then direct the money to charity over time. Fidelity, Schwab and Vanguard are among the financial firms offering these planned giving accounts.

2. Use IRA distributions

People who are 70½ or older and are taking required minimum distributions from an individual retirement account can funnel those withdrawals directly to charity (up to a max of $100,000 a year). With what’s called a qualified charitable distribution (QCD), donors can’t write off the gift, but they won’t owe income taxes on the withdrawal. So in the 22 percent federal tax bracket, a $10,000 QCD saves $2,200 in taxes. (A QCD is not an option with 401(k) savings plans or, in virtually all cases, from Roth IRAs.)

3. Donate stock winners

Another way to come up with a big gift is to tap into investment portfolios. More than nine years into this bull market, donors may be sitting on highly appreciated stocks or mutual funds. By donating that stock instead of selling it, donors may be able to deduct the full market value. They also avoid the big tax bill they would face if they cashed out and kept the profits.

Another option is to keep the stocks or funds in their portfolio and donate the shares. Then using the cash that they would have donated to your nonprofit, they can buy more shares in the same investments.

4. Save more in high-tax states

Charitable giving can be particularly beneficial for those who live in states with high income taxes. If the limits on state and local tax deductions push their overall tax rate higher, the value of their donations is higher too. That’s because every dollar donated (assuming itemizing is worthwhile) saves a higher amount in taxes. Capital gains also fall into the new federal law limiting state tax deductions to $10,000. For donors who live in states with capital gains taxes, their effective tax rate on those gains has gone “way up,” making it even more advantageous to donate winning stocks to your nonprofit before December 31.

Finally, it’s essential to make your nonprofit stand out to donors by providing accurate and complete information. Dazzle them with your infrastructure and financial efficiencies. These items will go a long way in persuading your donors that their dollars go further with you.

Article contributed by Javier Goldin, the Center’s CPA Partner. Javier is also a Founding and Managing Partner with Goldin Group CPAs in Bethesda, MD, chosen nationally as an Innovator Firm for the profession.

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February 23 – March 1

Bright Beginnings Executive Director, Marla Dean, discussed national efforts to reduce child poverty in NPR.

A report by Council for Court Excellence about the challenges individuals exiting prison face in Washington, DC was highlighted in WAMU 88.5.

The Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington, DC will perform Let Freedom Sing, a glittering musical celebration of the African American influence on civil and equal rights, on March 16 at 4:00pm and 8:00pm at the Lincoln Theatre. Their vocal ensemble Potomac Fever will perform a special concert at Asbury Methodist Village on March 2 as part of their outreach program.

Generation Hope will hold three Mentor Open Houses this spring: March 14 in Washington, DC, April 25 in Alexandria, Virginia, and May 16 in Prince George’s County, Maryland. Individuals and groups (families, partners, friends, colleagues, etc.) are welcome to attend and learn more about being matched with teen parents attending college in the Washington, DC metro area for the 2019/2020 academic year.

Nonprofit Village recognizes two organizations for their work in bettering our communities: Interfaith Works (large nonprofit category) and Passion for Learning (small nonprofit category). They will be awarded at the Nonprofit Village Making a Difference Awards Breakfast on Friday, May 3 from 7:00-9:30am at the Bethesda Marriott Pooks Hill.

YWCA National Capital Area is presenting a free screening of the movie, The Hate U Give, according to Hoodline. Following the movie, the organization will host a discussion on racism and police violence.

 

February 16 – 22

Food & Friends was featured on WTOP for their work delivering nutritious meals to expectant mothers and their families.

For Love of Children will hold its annual College Night event on Friday, March 1, 2019, featuring panel discussions with college admissions counselors, current college students, parents of college freshmen, as well as scholarship representatives.

A report by the Institute for Local Self-Reliance on the rise of dollar stores in low-income communities was featured in WAMU 88.5

National Low Income Housing Coalition president and CEO, Diane Yentel, commented on U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s overhaul of health and safety inspections of taxpayer-subsidized housing in NBC News.

The Salvation Army National Capital Area Command will host its 2nd Annual Diamond Gala on March 9, 2019 at the Fairmont Hotel. The purpose of the Gala is to raise funds and awareness for The Salvation Army’s Anti-Human Trafficking Program, with additional opportunities to support other vital services offered by the organization.

Unlocking Potential is offering its UnlockIt Series, a 3-part leadership training series that helps participants master the tools and disciplines practiced by the world’s most admired leaders, as well as solve common, challenging problems. Discounts are available to Center members.

Washington Regional Alcohol Program’s report on drunk driving on road safety in the Region was highlighted on WTOP.

 

February 9 – 15

On March 1st, Capital Area Asset Builders (CAAB) will hold #DCAhorrayProspera Forum: Wealth Creation Strategies for Low/Moderate-Income Washingtonians to shine a spotlight on the role and benefits of being banked, managing savings plans, accessing financial products and services, accessing credit-building strategies, accessing savings programs & platforms, and implementing debt reduction.

Institute for Local Self-Reliance was highlighted in a WAMU 88.5 story about recycling in the region.

The Ron Kowalski Real Estate Group will host the 12th Annual Monopoly Game Tournament on March 2, 2019 to benefit the Lorton Community Action Center (LCAC). The tournament includes two preliminary rounds and a final round where the top six competitors play for a prize of $500.

Marking the culmination of a joint public-private effort to bring services and resources to DC’s communities most in need, Trinity Plaza features 49 affordable apartment units, 12,000 square feet of office space, 6000 square feet of retail space and a 2000 square foot community center. Those interested in the apartments should register for one of the Lydia House (W8) Homebuyer & HPAP Orientations.

Miriam’s Kitchen Executive Chef Cheryl Bell was profiled on NBC4 Washington. Chef Bell started as a volunteer with the organization, prior to moving into the role.

National Peace Corps Association was highlighted in Forbes for their work helping returning volunteers transition to career and educational opportunities.

 

February 1 – 8

On February 5, the DC City Council issued a ceremonial resolution recognizing the Beacon House teen writers of “The Day Tajon Got Shot,” a Black Lives Matter movement-inspired work of fiction that won two national awards in 2018. Ward 5 Councilmember Kenyan McDuffie presented the recognition resolution to the authors, who were ages 11-13 when they began writing the book.

The Center for Nonprofit Advancement will launch its Board Leadership Award call for nominations on February 12, 2019.

Community Foodworks keeps two farmers markets open throughout the winter in Virginia: Oakton 9:00-1:00 on Saturdays and Arlington 9:00-12:00 on Saturdays.

A new nonprofit accelerator program operated by Community Foundation of the New River Valley was featured in Roanoke Times. The two-day program aims to support and advance small and struggling nonprofits.

Foundation Center and GuideStar announced a merger in Fast Company and The Chronicle of Philanthropy. The new organization, Candid, aims to be the go-to source for information on grants and nonprofits.

Parent Educational Advocacy Training Center (PEATC) posted an article “Turning 18 in Virginia: What Individuals with Disabilities Need to Consider” and their March and April calendar of parent training opportunities.

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January 26 – 31

WJLA provided a preview of the Army Historical Foundation’s National Museum of the United States Army, set to open in 2020.

Colleen Wevodau, President of Calvary Women’s Services Board of Directors and Senior Manager at Baker Tilly Virchow Krause, posted an article about the Baker Tilly Wishes campaign announcing that Calvary is one of five organizations to receive a $10,000 grant.

DC Central Kitchen received a large food donation from Tyson Foods in an effort to assist federal workers affected by the government shutdown according to KARK. DC Central Kitchen was also highlighted in WTOP for their efforts to provide fresh produce and healthy snacks to low-income areas.

The Keegan Theatre is having a special food drive throughout its run of The Baltimore Waltz to benefit Food & Friends according to Broadway World.

Humane Farm Animal Care’s animal welfare rating program was featured on Vox.

Miriam’s Kitchen discussed the limits of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in The Washington Post.

Washington Regional Alcohol Program President Kurt Erickson commented on a recently released report about the increase of drunk driving related deaths in 2017 in Montgomery Community Media, WJLA, and The Washington Post.

 

January 12 – 25

Bright Beginnings, N Street Village and So Others Might Eat raised a total of $254,837 in this year’s The Washington Post Helping Hand Campaign. Over 1,472 individuals donated to the organizations this holiday season.

Brighter Strategies and Alliance for Nonprofit Management will co-sponsor a one-day seminar, Racial Equity and Implications for Capacity Building Practice: A Deeper Dive, on February 22 at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, 901 15th Street, Washington, DC.

Casey Trees discussed the relocation of a 600,000 pound tree in Washington, DC on WAMU 88.5.

Center for Digital Democracy Executive Director, Jeffrey Chester, discussed data privacy regulation in USA TODAY.

Research by the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) revealing Asian-American students pursuing higher education have the highest amount of unmet financial needs was featured in NBC News.

Food & Friends extended its services to furloughed federal employees dealing with a serious illness according to The Washington Blade.

Friends of Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens Executive Director, Tina O’Connell, discussed ways the government shutdown impacted volunteer efforts over the MLK weekend in WAMU 88.5 and The Washington Post.

A report by the Institute for Local Self-Reliance about bringing high-speed internet to rural communities was featured in Nonprofit Quarterly.

Latino Economic Development Center discussed ways the federal government shutdown impacts Maryland small business owners in the Baltimore Business Journal.

National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIH) discussed how the federal government shutdown is affecting nonprofit groups dedicated to helping low-income renters in The New York TimesNLIH President and CEO, Diane Yentel, expressed concerns over federal rental assistance contracts that have not been renewed due to the federal government shutdown on National Public Radio and Huffington Post.

National Catholic Educational Association announced the 2019 Youth Virtues, Valor and Vision Award recipient according to WTKR.

Northern Virginia Family Service will receive a $35,000 grant from the United Way of the National Capital Area according Fairfax Times. Funds will be used to provide rental, mortgage and utility assistance. United Way NCA was also featured in a Washington Business Journal article on local nonprofits stepping up to assist furloughed federal employees.

Washington Regional Alcohol Program President, Kurt Erickson, commented on the need for stronger seat-belt laws in Virginia on WHSV.

 

January 4 – 11

Applications to the Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington are now open! Being part of the Catalogue network means you will be recognized as “one of the best” high-impact, community-based nonprofits in the region. Learn more at cfp-dc.org/apply.

The Center for Nonprofit Advancement and Serve DC will partner again to implement Volunteer Generation Fund 2019, building on the success of VGF 2018. The program supports increasing the number of volunteer men of color working with nonprofit organizations in the District. The deadline for applications is Wednesday, January 16.

Fairfax Leadership is now accepting applications for the classes of 2019 – 2020. To help applicants learn more about the process, several free virtual webinars have been scheduled.

Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter Director Judy Hanley applauded Virginia State Del. Wendy Gooditis for introducing legislation aimed at combating child abuse, specifically sexual abuse in the Loudoun Times-Mirror.

National Low Income Housing Coalition discussed ways the federal government shutdown is impacting local public housing authorities and individuals who rely on rental assistance programs in Curbed, WUSA9 and CNBC.

Arlington County Board announced the recent appointment of David Heilig to the Rosslyn Business Improvement District according to InsideNoVA.

United Way of the National Capital Area was one of the local organizations featured on WUSA9 and InsideNoVA for their efforts to provide furloughed federal workers with food, rent and utility assistance

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As Executive Director for DC SCORES, Bethany Henderson shares her perspective on leadership

A nationally recognized social entrepreneur, Bethany assumed her leadership role with DC SCORES in 2014. An Echoing Green Fellow and a White House Fellow, Bethany’s career has spanned the social, for-profit and government sectors. While in the White House, Bethany coordinated the 2013 Youth Jobs+ initiative and participated in developing My Brother’s Keeper, a public-private partnership focused on helping boys and young men of color get and stay on track, cradle to career.

In 2008, Bethany founded City Hall Fellows, an award-winning, nonpartisan, post-college, local government service corps, raising more than $4M to launch and build the organization during the recession. City Hall Fellows uses service-learning principles to prepare young people to take active civic leadership roles in their own hometowns.

Tell us about your leadership style and how this contributes to your organization’s success.

I believe in the wisdom of a well-known African proverb: “if you want to go far, go together.” My leadership style is shared leadership. To me, shared leadership means empowering all members of a team by giving each an opportunity to assume leadership and ownership over their area(s) of expertise. It does not mean I abdicate responsibility for setting a clear organizational direction or strategy or for making difficult decisions. Nor does it mean that I have created a work environment of a bunch of individuals running around doing their own thing.

Rather, my style involves intentionally empowering both our organizational departments as a whole and every member of our team to operate to their maximum potential and capacity, both individually and together.

Shared leadership is not something I simply talk about, or even just model, it is an ethos baked into the way we operate. For example, our team (staff and Board) together developed, and now utilize, a structured strategic decision making tool to inform significant decisions. That tool expressly requires input from all staff with specific, relevant knowledge, regardless of that staffer’s job title, tenure or “level.”

Likewise, we’ve built a teamwork culture that not only values all people speaking up and managing up, down and across, but also that empowers them too. I’ve instituted the practice that all new staff members go to “managing up and across” training and new supervisors go to “managing staff” training (we’re partial to The Management Center’s trainings).

All staff members are trained in the leadership compass, which creates a common language for communication that makes it easier for them to both express their needs in the workplace and meet others’ needs in ways that keep any feeling of personal attacks or affronts out of it. In fact, we all (me included!) display our compass points on our office doors or desk nameplates.

Another example is that we have an open calendar policy – every single person who works at DC SCORES, from the intern to me, can see everyone else’s calendars. We aggressively and consistently document notes from team meetings, Board committee meetings, project meetings, and more in a Google Drive structure that allows all relevant staff and Board members 24/7 access to materials and institutional knowledge they need, while still allowing senior management to control access to specific documents or document collections for privacy reasons.

Another example is that staff is invited (and actively encouraged) to attend the first half hour of every Board meeting and have dinner with the Board. At each Board meeting, different staff members stay to share their work directly with the Board.

Finally, while I often sit in on various department and event planning meetings, my public role in those environments (and at our major events) is as team member not project leader. The project or event leaders publicly lead the department meetings or events.

I could go on, but these examples at least give you a flavor of how I operationalize shared leadership. This contributes to DC SCORES’ success in myriad ways. First, it keeps me out of micro-managing situations where other staff have far more expertise than I do, while ensuring that staff come to me when issues that impact our organizational, financial, or governance strategy arise. This ensures organizational activities move forward efficiently without bureaucratic bottlenecks, while at the same time ensuring we keep our strategic focus.

Second, it allows us to do much more with fewer people than would be possible if staff felt compelled to go through laborious hierarchical decision-making processes for routine activities.

Third, it has empowered staff to experiment within their areas of expertise – resulting in important new initiatives for us like the “Our Words Our City” poetry series (featuring our most talented spoken-word artists), and far more efficient and effective site-management protocols that leverage technology and data (instead of just informal “boots on the ground” observations) to improve program quality.

Finally, it has allowed staff to be comfortable speaking with Board members directly, and vice-versa, without me in the middle. This has resulted in Board members feeling more connected to the organization, staff feeling more valued, and a greater comprehension by both Board and staff of what the other group does on behalf of DC SCORES.

What advice would you offer for other nonprofit leaders?

Effective, efficient, usable infrastructure really matters. Solid infrastructure coupled with clear north stars for which staff are held accountable keeps the team mission-focused, provides early warning signals about potential challenges, increases efficiency, facilitates being a learning organization, and smoothes personnel transitions by retaining institutional knowledge. However, at the end of the day, it’s all about the people. Without passionate, dedicated, curious, committed people at all levels of a nonprofit – people who wholeheartedly buy into the cause, who feel part of the team, who feel ownership over the impact – even the best systems will fail.

I urge nonprofit leaders to spend as much time on your people as on systems and fundraising. To me, spending time on people means being very intentional about building the right team when hiring; empowering staff to be successful leaders in their own specialties/functions; supporting staff when they stumble; keeping abreast of individual staffer’s strengths, growth opportunities, and career goals; openly taking responsibility for your own mistakes or missteps and setting a public example for how to handle them; and meaningfully engaging staff in constructively tackling organizational challenges.

What does this award mean for you and your organization?

As DC SCORES approaches our 25th anniversary next year, this award would be incredible public validation and affirmation (not just for me, but for our entire team) of years of hard work to turn around an organization that means so much to many, and to set it up for success for the next 25 years.

Six weeks into my tenure, at the beginning of a new fiscal year, DC SCORES experienced the unanticipated loss of a significant funder (due to the funder’s unannounced shift in focus away from children). This was not a problem I created, nor was a turnaround that I had been hired to do. After much deliberation, I decided to take a chance on leading DC SCORES through that crisis and, after much deliberation, the Board decided to take a chance on me doing so successfully.

Four years — and countless difficult decisions and long days later — I’m very proud that DC SCORES not only survived, but is thriving with stronger infrastructure, better financial controls, a highly-engaged governing and fundraising Board, much-improved fundraising capacity and success, and as high-quality programming as ever. In that time we’ve also grown substantially and, as importantly, sustainably – serving nearly 70% more children/year (nearly 3,000 total) at 40% more sites (65 total), and launching multiple new program streams (including Jr. SCORES for K-2 students; a rec center soccer league co-run with DPR; and enhanced spoken word and soccer programming for uniquely talented children).

It also would be meaningful external affirmation of DC SCORES’ commitment to be not just an impactful, but a sustainable, trustworthy long-term presence in the neighborhoods we serve and in kids’ lives. Our waitlist continues to grow, even as we add new sites to our roster. This award will validate for prospective funders that DC SCORES is an investment worthy of their resources – which we hope will ultimately allow us to serve more kids who need us.

Finally, but no less importantly, this award will be a morale boost to our 200+ community-based coaches. Approximately 80% of our coaches are schoolteachers or school administrative or support staff doing second shift with us. While we do pay and train our coaches, they don’t coach for the money. They coach because they care about kids, because they care about their school community, and because they believe DC SCORES’ unique model significantly improves both individual child outcomes and, at the same time, significantly strengthens the entire school community. As I publicly tell coaches at every opportunity, they are the real heroes, they are the real change-makers here, not me, and my job is to make sure our coaches have all the tools, infrastructure and resources they need to focus on the kids without distraction. Knowing that the Center and other “outsiders” recognize the intentional efforts we make at DC SCORES to put coaches and kids first will feel uplifting to our coaches, reinforcing that “outsiders” value my commitment to them and their commitment to DC’s most vulnerable kids.

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Bethany Rubin Henderson, Executive Director

DC SCORES

 

Tell us about your leadership style and how this contributes to your organization’s success.

I believe in the wisdom of a well-known African proverb: “if you want to go far, go together.” My leadership style is shared leadership. To me, shared leadership means empowering all members of a team by giving each an opportunity to assume leadership and ownership over their area(s) of expertise. It does not mean I abdicate responsibility for setting a clear organizational direction or strategy or for making difficult decisions. Nor does it mean that I have created a work environment of a bunch of individuals running around doing their own thing.

Rather, my style involves intentionally empowering both our organizational departments as a whole and every member of our team to operate to their maximum potential and capacity, both individually and together.

Shared leadership is not something I simply talk about, or even just model, it is an ethos baked into the way we operate. For example, our team (staff and Board) together developed, and now utilize, a structured strategic decision making tool to inform significant decisions. That tool expressly requires input from all staff with specific, relevant knowledge, regardless of that staffer’s job title, tenure or “level.”

Likewise, we’ve built a teamwork culture that not only values all people speaking up and managing up, down and across, but also that empowers them too. I’ve instituted the practice that all new staff members go to “managing up and across” training and new supervisors go to “managing staff” training (we’re partial to The Management Center’s trainings).

All staff members are trained in the leadership compass, which creates a common language for communication that makes it easier for them to both express their needs in the workplace and meet others’ needs in ways that keep any feeling of personal attacks or affronts out of it. In fact, we all (me included!) display our compass points on our office doors or desk nameplates.

Another example is that we have an open calendar policy – every single person who works at DC SCORES, from the intern to me, can see everyone else’s calendars. We aggressively and consistently document notes from team meetings, Board committee meetings, project meetings, and more in a Google Drive structure that allows all relevant staff and Board members 24/7 access to materials and institutional knowledge they need, while still allowing senior management to control access to specific documents or document collections for privacy reasons.

Another example is that staff is invited (and actively encouraged) to attend the first half hour of every Board meeting and have dinner with the Board. At each Board meeting, different staff members stay to share their work directly with the Board.

Finally, while I often sit in on various department and event planning meetings, my public role in those environments (and at our major events) is as team member not project leader. The project or event leaders publicly lead the department meetings or events.

I could go on, but these examples at least give you a flavor of how I operationalize shared leadership. This contributes to DC SCORES’ success in myriad ways. First, it keeps me out of micro-managing situations where other staff have far more expertise than I do, while ensuring that staff come to me when issues that impact our organizational, financial, or governance strategy arise. This ensures organizational activities move forward efficiently without bureaucratic bottlenecks, while at the same time ensuring we keep our strategic focus.

Second, it allows us to do much more with fewer people than would be possible if staff felt compelled to go through laborious hierarchical decision-making processes for routine activities.

Third, it has empowered staff to experiment within their areas of expertise – resulting in important new initiatives for us like the “Our Words Our City” poetry series (featuring our most talented spoken-word artists), and far more efficient and effective site-management protocols that leverage technology and data (instead of just informal “boots on the ground” observations) to improve program quality.

Finally, it has allowed staff to be comfortable speaking with Board members directly, and vice-versa, without me in the middle. This has resulted in Board members feeling more connected to the organization, staff feeling more valued, and a greater comprehension by both Board and staff of what the other group does on behalf of DC SCORES.

What advice would you offer for other nonprofit leaders?

Effective, efficient, usable infrastructure really matters. Solid infrastructure coupled with clear north stars for which staff are held accountable keeps the team mission-focused, provides early warning signals about potential challenges, increases efficiency, facilitates being a learning organization, and smoothes personnel transitions by retaining institutional knowledge. However, at the end of the day, it’s all about the people. Without passionate, dedicated, curious, committed people at all levels of a nonprofit – people who wholeheartedly buy into the cause, who feel part of the team, who feel ownership over the impact – even the best systems will fail.

I urge nonprofit leaders to spend as much time on your people as on systems and fundraising. To me, spending time on people means being very intentional about building the right team when hiring; empowering staff to be successful leaders in their own specialties/functions; supporting staff when they stumble; keeping abreast of individual staffer’s strengths, growth opportunities, and career goals; openly taking responsibility for your own mistakes or missteps and setting a public example for how to handle them; and meaningfully engaging staff in constructively tackling organizational challenges.

What does this award mean for you and your organization?

As DC SCORES approaches our 25th anniversary next year, this award would be incredible public validation and affirmation (not just for me, but for our entire team) of years of hard work to turn around an organization that means so much to many, and to set it up for success for the next 25 years.

Six weeks into my tenure, at the beginning of a new fiscal year, DC SCORES experienced the unanticipated loss of a significant funder (due to the funder’s unannounced shift in focus away from children). This was not a problem I created, nor was a turnaround that I had been hired to do. After much deliberation, I decided to take a chance on leading DC SCORES through that crisis and, after much deliberation, the Board decided to take a chance on me doing so successfully.

Four years — and countless difficult decisions and long days later — I’m very proud that DC SCORES not only survived, but is thriving with stronger infrastructure, better financial controls, a highly-engaged governing and fundraising Board, much-improved fundraising capacity and success, and as high-quality programming as ever. In that time we’ve also grown substantially and, as importantly, sustainably – serving nearly 70% more children/year (nearly 3,000 total) at 40% more sites (65 total), and launching multiple new program streams (including Jr. SCORES for K-2 students; a rec center soccer league co-run with DPR; and enhanced spoken word and soccer programming for uniquely talented children).

It also would be meaningful external affirmation of DC SCORES’ commitment to be not just an impactful, but a sustainable, trustworthy long-term presence in the neighborhoods we serve and in kids’ lives. Our waitlist continues to grow, even as we add new sites to our roster. This award will validate for prospective funders that DC SCORES is an investment worthy of their resources – which we hope will ultimately allow us to serve more kids who need us.

Finally, but no less importantly, this award will be a morale boost to our 200+ community-based coaches. Approximately 80% of our coaches are schoolteachers or school administrative or support staff doing second shift with us. While we do pay and train our coaches, they don’t coach for the money. They coach because they care about kids, because they care about their school community, and because they believe DC SCORES’ unique model significantly improves both individual child outcomes and, at the same time, significantly strengthens the entire school community. As I publicly tell coaches at every opportunity, they are the real heroes, they are the real change-makers here, not me, and my job is to make sure our coaches have all the tools, infrastructure and resources they need to focus on the kids without distraction. Knowing that the Center and other “outsiders” recognize the intentional efforts we make at DC SCORES to put coaches and kids first will feel uplifting to our coaches, reinforcing that “outsiders” value my commitment to them and their commitment to DC’s most vulnerable kids.

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